google_doodle_rube_goldberg.jpg
google_doodle_rube_goldberg.jpg



THE DESIGN CYCLEDESIGN FOLDER
STEP 1: INVESTIGATE
a. Identify the Problem:
1. How does the Design Cycle apply to your project, life, and society?
a. Project:
We must use the design cycle to build a Rube Goldberg machine.
b. Life (Think future jobs):
In our future jobs, we will probably have to use the design cycle.
c. Society:
We can use the design cycle to do other stuff in life.
2. Identify the problem:
newdesigncycle.gif
newdesigncycle.gif

We must build a Rube Goldberg machine using a box of random junk that Ms. Bradfield has stashed away in her closet.
b. Develop the Design Brief:
3. List four questions to research about creating a Rube Goldberg Machine: (ADD THE ANSWERS TO YOUR QUESTIONS)
How sturdy are our materials?
What's an easy task for a marble to do?
How can you trigger a marble to drop with another marble?
What angle should we build our slopes?
4. List four resources that could answer your questions:
Stanford University's site.
Any website ending in .gov
Any website ending in .org
The NASA website
5. How do you know that these resources are trustworthy? Give
evidence for each site:

  1. Wikipedia can be a reliable source if the information comes from a reliable source.
  2. .Gov websites were made by the government. That's trustworthy.
  3. .Org websites are made by a specific, certified organization.
  4. NASA is a professional science company.

6. Explain why not all Internet sources are trustworthy?
Some websites are designed by trained monkey scammers that want your social security number. You can't learn a thing from those websites.
c. Formulate a Design Specification - The Design Brief Continued:
7. List all the requirements you must meet to create the Rube Goldberg Machine:

  1. It must be at least three feet tall.
  2. It must have at least 5 straight drops. All five drops must be a different length.
  3. It must change directions at least 15 times. You decide the direction and the slope.
  4. It must stand on it’s own. You cannot use a table or chair to balance it.
  5. It also must be portable.
  6. You may only use the materials provided.
  7. You may also bring one throw away items from home. For example, a milk carton, juice carton, a box, egg carton, and/or a cereal box. Do not bug your parents and tell them you need a milk carton. Get some thing that is not needed any more.

8. Add three of your own requirements:

  1. We need to get at least a 5.
  2. We need to do a totally pointless task.
  3. We need to stay on task

9. How many times will you test your machine before the final test?
At least do it 3 times right.
10. Why is it important to test your machine before the final day?
So it doesn't just catastrophically fail on test day.
11. How does making a Rube Goldberg Machine apply to a real world situation?
It can teach you just how to make stuff work.
STEP 2: PLAN
a. Design a Product or Solution:
12. Create three completely different designs: I have the paper for you. Please fill out the chart and hand the paper in the basket. An example of the chart is below:

Explanation
Sketch
Pros and Cons


Pros:
1.

2

Cons:
1.

2


Pros:
1.

2

Cons:
1.

2


Pros:
1.

2

Cons:
1.

2


b. Plan a Product or Solution:
13. Which design do you think will work best?
Design #1
14. Why did you choose this design?
It is simple but we can make it look complex.
15. List the steps to create your design: (You need to create your own steps and organize your time and resources.)
Create the track.
Create the water feature.
Add embellishment!
16. Did you need to troubleshoot your plan? What did you troubleshoot?
We troubleshooted our plan a ton. It seemed like everything was going wrong.
STEP 3: CREATE
a. Use Appropriate Techniques and Equipment:
17. List three safety tips you need to follow to while creating your machine:
Don't burn yourself on the glue gun.
Wear safety goggles when smashing plastic tubes.
Be careful with scissors.
b. Follow the Plan:
18. Did you follow your plan?
Yes
19. Did you create steps that were easy to follow?
Yes
20. Did you follow my requirements?
Yes
c. Create the Product/Solution:
21. What areas of your plan needed troubleshooting?
All of them.
22. Were you able to troubleshoot effectively? Explain:
Yes. When something went wrong, we thought of how to fix it, and fixed it.
23. Did you follow all my requirements and your plan to create an excellent Rube Goldberg Machine? Explain:
Heck yes. It has 18 direction changes, 7 traight drops, and is the awesomest in the whole calss! (and we're so humble too, huh?)
STEP 4: EVALUATE
a. Evaluate the Product/Solution:
24. Was your design successful?
yes
25. Did you test your machine before the final day? How many times did you test it?
Yes. We tested it more than 3 times.
26. How could you improve your solution?
We could make it longer.
27. What part of your design would you use again?
The end result.
b. Evaluate the Use of the Design Cycle:
28. Grade yourself, using the IB Rubric, for each stage of the Design Cycle. Get the rubric from me.

29. How can the Design Cycle be used in other subject areas?
It can be used in math, reading, writing, and pretty much everything.
30. How can the Design Cycle be used in your life and society? (List three)
I can use it in my job.
i can use it in my family life.
i can use it in Boy Scouts.
31. How is the Design Cycle important to the successful outcome of a project?
the design cycle makes things better.
32. What grade do you deserve and why?
I think I deserve an A becasue I was the brains of this entire project.